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About ICCPUD

The Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2004 directed the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) to establish the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Prevention of Underage Drinking (ICCPUD) and to issue an annual report summarizing all Federal agency activities related to preventing underage alcohol use. HHS made ICCPUD a standing committee to provide ongoing, high-level leadership on this issue and to coordinate federal efforts aimed at preventing and reducing underage drinking.

Fifteen federal agencies are members of ICCPUD; the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, an agency within HHS, serves as the lead agency. Click on an icon below or select from the dropdown list for more information about an agency and its underage drinking prevention resources.


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Federal Trade Commission The Office of National Drug Control Policy U.S. Department of Defense U.S. Department of Education U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families The Indian Health Service Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism National Institute on Drug Abuse Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation Office of the Surgeon General Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration U.S. Department of Justice U.S. Department of Transportation U.S. Department of the Treasury



Federal Trade Commission

Federal Trade Commission

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is the Nation's consumer protection agency. Its Bureau of Consumer Protection works to prevent fraud, deception, and unfair business practices in the marketplace. Marketing or selling alcohol to anyone under age 21 is unsafe, irresponsible, and illegal. Under the Sober Truth on Preventing Underage Drinking Act of 2006, FTC is responsible for reporting on alcohol-related messages that young people are exposed to in advertising and the entertainment media.

Federal Trade Commission Resources

Alcohol Retailers Can Help Reduce Teen Drinking
Retailers play an essential role in reducing access to alcohol by underage youth. They can take steps to make sure that teens can’t buy alcohol from their stores, and they can serve as a source of information to reduce the possibility that alcohol legally sold to an adult will end up in a teenager’s hands. This printable Web page lists recommended practices for retailers to use to meet these goals. (Federal Trade Commission; no date)

Self-Regulation in the Alcohol Industry: Report of the Federal Trade Commission
This publication reports on efforts by the alcohol industry to reduce the likelihood that alcohol advertising will target youth, by its placement or content. It provides data about how industry members allocate promotional dollars; data on compliance with the industry’s advertising placement standard (requiring that at least 70 percent of the audience for advertising consist of adults 21 and older); analysis of external review of advertising complaints; and an update on FTC’s “We Don’t Serve Teens” campaign. (Federal Trade Commission; 2008)

We Don’t Serve Teens Web Site
Most teens who drink get alcohol from “social sources”—at parties, from older friends, from their parents’ cabinets. Teen drinking is linked to injury and risky behavior. This Web site provides parents, retailers, law enforcement, and others with tools and information to reduce teen drinking and related harm by reducing their easy access to alcohol.

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The Office of National Drug Control Policy

The Office of National Drug Control Policy

The Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), a component of the Executive Office of the President, establishes policies, priorities, and objectives for the Nation's drug control program. ONDCP views the prevention of drug use before it begins as a cost-effective, commonsense approach to promoting safe and healthy communities. Alcohol is the most commonly used substance among youth in the United States, exceeding the use of tobacco and illicit drugs.

Office of National Drug Control Policy Resources

Above the Influence Activities Toolkit
This toolkit was designed to be a user-friendly resource to help youth group leaders facilitate discussions with teens about the influences around them, including the pressure to use drugs and alcohol, and ways to stay above the influence. (Office of National Drug Control Policy; 2011)

Please visit the following ONDCP-sponsored Web sites for many additional resources for youth, their families, and communities to prevent underage drinking.

Above the Influence
Above the Influence (ATI) is an interactive drug prevention site for youth. The goal of the site is to help youth be more aware of the influences around them and better prepare them to stand up to the pressures that can keep them down. Youth can take quizzes, download fun stuff, listen to podcasts, submit notes and pictures, and view ATI ads.

Above the Influence

Parents. The Antidrug
TheAntiDrug.com was created by the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign to equip parents and other adult caregivers with the tools they need to raise drug-free kids. Working with the Nation's leading experts in the fields of parenting and substance abuse prevention, TheAntiDrug.com serves as a drug prevention information center and a supportive community for parents to interact with and learn from one another.

TheAnti-Drug.com

National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign
This is the central Web site for all National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign activities and information. Visitors can view the campaign's TV, radio, and print ads and download banner ads for use on their own sites. The site also provides information on how the public can get involved with the campaign, links to other campaign sites, a listing of campaign publications, and news about campaign initiatives.

National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign

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U.S. Department of Defense

U.S. Department of Defense

The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) is represented in the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Prevention of Underage Drinking by the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense. Because the physical health and well-being of military personnel are critical to national security and combat readiness, DoD regularly monitors substance use by its troops to determine if preventive action is necessary. According to the most recent survey data, military personnel aged 18 to 25 showed significantly higher rates of heavy drinking (26 percent) than did civilians (16 percent). In response, DoD launched “That Guy” to reduce alcohol use and abuse by enlisted personnel aged 18 to 24.

U.S. Department of Defense Resources

Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors Among Active Duty Military Personnel: 2008 Survey Summary as Q&A
This 2009 report from the Military Health System summarizes the results of a periodically conducted survey of active-duty military personnel to assess substance abuse, mental well-being, deployment issues, fitness, nutrition, and weight management. (Military Health System; 2009)

That Guy Web Site
The 2005 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors revealed a rising rate of binge drinking among the 708,820 junior enlisted personnel in all of the armed services. In response, the DoD/TRICARE® Management Activity (TMA) launched “That Guy,” a multiyear campaign for enlisted personnel aged 18–24 to raise their awareness of the negative effects of excessive drinking and to help reduce alcohol abuse.

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U.S. Department of Education

U.S. Department of Education

The mission of the U.S. Department of Education (ED) is to promote student achievement and preparation for global competitiveness by fostering educational excellence and ensuring equal access. Under Title V of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (authorized by the America's Schools Act of 1994), ED provides financial assistance for programs and activities that promote the health and well being of students in elementary and secondary schools and institutions of higher education. ED is represented on the Interagency Coordinating Committee to Prevent Underage Drinking by the Office of Safe and Healthy Students.

U.S. Department of Education Resources

Alcohol and Other Drugs on Campus—The Scope of the Problem
The most widespread health problem on college and university campuses in the United States is high-risk alcohol and other drug use. This overview provides data on the scope and consequences of underage drinking on campuses across the country. (Higher Education Center, U.S. Department of Education; 2003, updated 2008)

College Alcohol Risk Assessment Guide: Environmental Approaches to Prevention
Despite general agreement among campus officials and students that alcohol use contributes to a range of problems confronting colleges and universities, prevention often does not command a high priority for students, faculty, and staff. This guide is designed to help college administrators identify factors within the campus environment that contribute to alcohol-related problems. These factors are examined within the context of the public health approach, which emphasizes how the environment shapes behavior. (Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, U.S. Department of Education; updated 2009)

Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention Web Site
Funded by the U.S. Department of Education, the Higher Education Center provides support to all institutions of higher education in their efforts to address the problems related to alcohol and other drug abuse and violence. Through a variety of products and services, the Center works with colleges, universities, and proprietary schools nationwide to develop strategies for changing campus culture, to foster environments that promote healthy lifestyles, and to prevent high risk alcohol and other drug use and violence among students.

Prevention 101 Series
The Prevention 101 Series provides practitioners with critical information through essential tools in many foundational processes and prevention approaches. The introductory publications in this series address a range of topics, such as needs assessment, strategic planning, building coalitions, and evaluating prevention programs. (Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, U.S. Department of Education)

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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is the United States government’s principal agency for protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services, especially for those who are least able to help themselves. HHS is represented on the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Prevention of Underage Drinking by the following seven offices and agencies within the Department.

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Administration for Children and Families

Administration for Children and Families

The Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is responsible for Federal programs that promote the economic and social well-being of families, children, individuals, and communities. ACF programs aim, in part, to empower families and individuals to increase their own economic independence and productivity, as well as to create strong, healthy, supportive communities that have a positive impact on the quality of life and the development of children.

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The Indian Health Service

The Indian Health Service

The Indian Health Service (IHS), an agency within the Department of Health and Human Services, is responsible for providing federal health services to American Indians and Alaska Natives. The provision of health services to members of federally-recognized tribes grew out of the special government-to-government relationship between the federal government and Indian tribes. This relationship, established in 1787, is based on Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution, and has been given form and substance by numerous treaties, laws, Supreme Court decisions, and Executive Orders. The IHS is the principal federal health care provider and health advocate for Indian people, and its goal is to raise their health status to the highest possible level. The IHS provides a comprehensive health service delivery system for approximately 2 million American Indians and Alaska Natives who belong to 566 federally recognized tribes in 36 states.

The Indian Health Service Resources

I Strengthen My Nation Campaign
A media campaign launched in 2012 and featuring Hollywood actor Chaske Spencer encourages Native communities to address substance abuse by teens and young adults. The “I Strengthen My Nation” campaign empowers Native youth to resist drugs and alcohol and motivates parents to talk openly to their children about drug and alcohol use.

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The mission of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is to collaborate to create the expertise, information, and tools that people and communities need to protect their health—through health promotion; prevention of disease, injury, and disability; and preparedness for new health threats. Underage drinking is associated with disease, injury, and disabilities across the lifespan, including those from related violence, sexual assaults, impaired driving, and attempted suicides.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Resources

Youth Online
Youth Online lets you analyze national, State, and local Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) data from 1991 to 2009. Data from high school and middle school surveys are included. You can filter and sort on the basis of race/ethnicity, sex, grade, or site; create customized tables and graphs; and perform statistical tests by site and health topic, including “Alcohol and Other Drug Use.”

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System
The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) monitors priority health-risk behaviors and the prevalence of obesity and asthma among youth and young adults. The YRBSS includes the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), a national school-based survey of 9th- to 12th-grade students that is conducted every 2 years to record the prevalence and trend of behaviors—such as underage drinking—that place a young person’s health at risk. Behaviors that contribute to injuries, such as driving after consuming alcohol, also are reported. Middle school YRBS results are available for those States, districts, Territories, and tribal governments that conduct a middle school survey in their jurisdiction and obtained weighted data. The most recent YRBSS survey report was released in June 2010.

Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion: At a Glance Reports: Excessive Alcohol Use: Addressing a Leading Risk for Death, Chronic Disease, and Injury
This report summarizes statistics about binge drinking as a public health problem and steps being taken by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to address this problem. More than 4 out of 10 college students report binge drinking. Among high school students who drink alcohol, two out of three report binge drinking. (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; April 2011)

Alcohol and Public Health: Fact Sheets: Underage Drinking
This factsheet summarizes statistics about the prevalence and consequences of underage drinking. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; July 2010)

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Often called “the voice of CDC,” the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) series is CDC’s primary vehicle for scientific publication of timely, accurate, and objective public health information and recommendations. The data in the weekly MMWR are provisional, based on weekly reports to CDC by State health departments. Recent MMWRs related to underage drinking include:

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National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, supports and conducts biomedical and behavioral research on the causes, consequences, treatment, and prevention of alcohol abuse and alcoholism. Research supported by NIAAA has reframed our understanding of alcohol dependence in several ways by demonstrating that it is a developmental disorder that often has its roots in childhood and adolescence and that the highest prevalence of alcohol dependence in the U.S. general population occurs in 18- to 24-year-olds.

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Resources

Alcohol Alerts
The NIAAA Alcohol Alert is a quarterly bulletin that disseminates important research findings on a single aspect of alcohol abuse and alcoholism. Reports related to underage drinking include:

Parenting to Prevent Childhood Alcohol Use
Parenting styles may influence whether children follow their parents’ advice regarding alcohol use. This tip sheet offers advice to parents on ways in which they can guide children in avoiding underage drinking. (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; October 2010)

Please visit the following National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism–supported Web sites for many additional resources for youth, their families, and communities to prevent underage drinking:

  • The Cool Spot Web site, created for youth 11 to 13 years old, is based on a curriculum for grades six to eight developed by the University of Michigan as part of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism–supported Alcohol Misuse Prevention Study (AMPS). One goal of AMPS is to give young teens a clearer picture about alcohol use among their peers. Teens tend to overestimate how much their peers really drink. When they learn more accurate information, some of the pressure to drink can subside. Other goals of AMPS are to help youth learn skills to resist pressure to drink and to give them reasons not to drink. (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services)
  • College Drinking: Changing the Culture Web site is an outcome of the national Task Force on College Drinking. It supports the goals of the task force, which include (1) providing research-based information about the nature and extent of dangerous drinking to high school and college administrators, students, parents, community leaders, policymakers, researchers, and members of the retail beverage industry and (2) offering recommendations to college and university presidents on the potential effectiveness of current strategies to reverse the culture of drinking on campus. (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services)

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National Institute on Drug Abuse

National Institute on Drug Abuse

The mission of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is to lead the Nation in bringing the power of science to bear on drug abuse and addiction. This charge has two critical components. The first is the strategic support and promotion of research across a broad range of disciplines. The second is ensuring the rapid and effective dissemination and use of the results of that research to significantly improve prevention, treatment, and policy as it relates to drug abuse and addiction. Youth who begin drinking before age 15 are six times more likely to develop alcohol problems as adults than are those who do not drink before age 21.

National Institute on Drug Abuse Resources

Monitoring the Future
Since 1975, the National Institute on Drug Abuse has sponsored the annual Monitoring the Future (MTF) Survey, which measures drug, alcohol, and cigarette use and related attitudes among adolescent students nationwide. Survey participants report their drug use behaviors across three time periods: lifetime, past year, and past month. (National Institute on Drug Abuse)

NIDA for Teens: The Science Behind Drug Abuse Web Site
The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) created this Web site to educate adolescents ages 11 through 15 (as well as their parents and teachers) on the science behind drug abuse. Recognizing that teens want to be treated as equals, NIDA scientists were careful not to preach about the dangers of drug use. Rather, the site delivers science-based facts about how drugs affect the brain and body so that youth will be armed with better information to make healthy decisions. Elements such as animated illustrations, quizzes, and games are used throughout the site to clarify concepts, test the visitor’s knowledge, and make learning fun through interaction.

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Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation

Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation

Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, advises the Secretary on policy development in health, disability, human services, data, and science and provides advice and analysis on economic policy. ASPE may, among other activities, sponsor research, program evaluations, and literature reviews related to alcohol and drug use by young people.

Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation Resources

What Challenges Are Boys Facing and What Opportunities Exist to Address Those Challenges? Annotated Bibliography
This annotated bibliography is the result of a comprehensive review of literature on the strengths and challenges that affect boys ages 10 through 18. It includes articles related to programs and interventions for substance abuse. (Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; July 2008)

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Office of the Surgeon General

Office of the Surgeon General

The Office of the Surgeon General, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is under the direction of the Surgeon General. The Surgeon General serves as America's doctor by providing Americans the best scientific information available on how to improve their health and reduce the risk of illness and injury. In 2007, the office released the first-ever Surgeon General’s Call to Action To Prevent and Reduce Underage Drinking, which called on every American to do his or her part to prevent underage drinking.

Office of the Surgeon General Resources

Surgeon General’s Call to Action To Prevent and Reduce Underage Drinking  (PDF–1.4 MB)
This report focuses national attention on the enduring problem of underage drinking and on research that indicates that the developing adolescent brain may be particularly susceptible to long-term negative consequences from alcohol use. (For more information about the Call to Action, read this factsheet.) The full report is supplemented by:

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Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

The mission of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America's communities. SAMHSA’s many programs to create communities where individuals, families, schools, faith-based organizations, and workplaces take action to promote emotional health and reduce the likelihood of mental illness, substance abuse including tobacco, and suicide are described on this strategic initiative page.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Resources

Report to Congress on the Prevention and Reduction of Underage Drinking
This report presents statistics on the nature and extent of underage drinking in the United States. It also discusses the role of the Federal government in preventing and reducing underage drinking and reports on state policies, enforcement activities, and prevention programs underway to address the problem. (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, May 2011)

National Survey on Drug Use and Health
The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) provides national and State-level data on the use of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs (including nonmedical use of prescription drugs) and mental health in the United States. This annual survey is supported by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and is the primary source of information on prevalence, patterns, and consequences in the general U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population, ages 12 and older. Data and findings are reported in a full survey report as well as in numerous special short reports related to underage drinking.

NSDUH Reports on Underage Drinking
The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) is the primary source of information on the prevalence, patterns, and consequences of alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drug use and abuse in the general U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population, ages 12 and older. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration periodically publishes The NSDUH Report, which presents special topics based on NSDUH data. Reports related to underage drinking include:

SAMHSA Store
The SAMHSA Store is a central repository of its free publications, games, posters, and other resources related to promoting mental health and preventing and treating mental illnesses and substance abuse disorders. Enter “underage drinking” in the search box for a full listing of products on this public health problem.

Please visit the following Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services—sponsored Web sites for many additional resources for youth, their families and educators, and communities to prevent underage drinking:

  • Building Blocks for a Healthy Future campaign offers tips and activities for parents and a curriculum for preschool teachers to use in helping children 3 to 6 years old learn about good decisions and positive relationships and so create their foundation in avoiding harmful substances.
  • Too Smart To Start provides information about underage drinking prevention for youth and teens, their parents and educators, and community leaders.
  • SAMHSA’s “Talk. They Hear You.” campaign gives parents and caregivers the information and resources they need to start talking with children as young as age 9 about the dangers of underage drinking.

Quick Quiz Widget
Ready for a challenge? The Quick Quiz widget is an interactive and periodically changing feature that tests users’ knowledge on underage drinking. It is generated from the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Prevention of Underage Drinking’s research findings. The questions and answers are intended to stimulate discussions about preventing and reducing underage drinking among parents, educators, community-based organizations, and youth.

There is no cost to maintain the widget and very little time is required to copy it and share it with others. Test your knowledge today!


TSTS Newsroom and Widget: Save Time, Stay Informed, Share
The In the News newsroom, now featured on the Too Smart To Start (TSTS) home page, keeps individuals and organizations informed with the latest news on underage drinking. Sponsored by the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP), the newsroom is updated regularly with local, State, and national articles published by online sources. Sources include the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and its key partners, mainstream media, government agencies, and other reputable producers of news content. The newsroom features an archive for retrieval of past articles and a searchable database to make finding articles easier.

Also available is a widget that displays the newsroom content directly on your organization’s Web site. There’s no cost and very little time required to copy the widget and share up-to-date news on underage drinking.

TSTS Newsroom Widget

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U.S. Department of Justice

U.S. Department of Justice

The U.S. Department of Justice is represented in the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Prevention of Underage Drinking by its Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. In 2007, youth aged 10 to 17 years old accounted for 176,100 arrests for drunkenness, driving under the influence, and violating liquor laws. Alcohol use by underage drinkers is associated with many other forms of delinquency, such as sexual and physical assaults and disorderly conduct.

U.S. Department of Justice Resources

Juvenile Justice Bulletin: Underage Drinking: Practice Guidelines for Community Corrections
This bulletin offers 10 evidence-based practices for community supervision professionals who work with underage drinkers in developing a plan for screening youth, determining appropriate responses, creating a case plan, and providing treatment. The bulletin is part of OJJDP’s underage drinking bulletin series, which highlights the dangers of underage drinking and offers guidance to communities developing treatment and prevention programs. (U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; October 2012)

Juvenile Justice Bulletin: Effects and Consequences of Underage Drinking
This bulletin presents findings from a literature review that investigated how underage drinking can affect a youth’s physical, emotional, and neurological health. It also describes the legal, neurological, economic, and personal consequences youth can face when they make the decision to begin drinking. (U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; September 2012)

Juvenile Justice Bulletin: Reducing Drinking Among Underage Air Force Members in Five Communities
This bulletin describes an evaluation of enforcement activities conducted by five communities with a local U.S. Air Force base that had received an underage drinking prevention grant from OJJDP. (U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; August 2011)

Juvenile Justice Bulletin: Substance Use and Delinquent Behavior Among Serious Adolescent Offenders
This bulletin describes what is known about the relationships among adolescent substance use, criminal activity, and treatment, based on current research and data from Pathways to Desistance, an Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention–funded longitudinal study of adolescent offenders. (U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; December 2010)

Underage Drinking: Problem-Oriented Guides for Police: Problem-Specific Guides Series No. 27
This Problem-Specific Guide summarizes knowledge about how police can reduce the harm caused by underage drinking. It is intended as a guide to prevention and to improving the overall response to incidents, not to investigating offenses or handling specific incidents. (U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services; August 2010)

OJJDP in Focus: Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws Program
The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention manages the Enforcement of Underage Drinking Laws (EUDL) program, which supports and enhances efforts by States and local jurisdictions to reduce the availability of alcohol to minors. The program encourages close partnerships between law enforcement agencies and community groups involved in preventing and intervening in underage drinking. This publication describes the EUDL program objectives and provides case examples of local grantee efforts. (U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; October 2009)

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U.S. Department of Transportation

U.S. Department of Transportation

The U.S. Department of Transportation is represented in the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Prevention of Underage Drinking by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). In 2008, 11,773 people were killed in alcohol-impaired driving crashes; nearly 1,000 drivers with blood alcohol content over 0.08 percent were aged 16 to 20. NHTSA has developed a three-tiered strategy to prevent motor-vehicle-related deaths and injuries of teens by increasing seat belt use, implementing graduated driver licensing laws, and reducing teens' access to alcohol and drugs through parental responsibility.

U.S. Department of Transportation Resources

Parental Responsibility Toolkit 
This toolkit, in both English and Spanish, provides a factsheet and talking points about the role of parents in keeping teen drivers safe by enforcing rules, such as no alcohol use, for teen drivers. The toolkit also contains logos, Web banners, a sample press release, and 30- and 60-second TV public service announcements. (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation;2009)

Traffic Safety Facts: Alcohol-Impaired Driving: Fatal Crashes and Fatalities Involving Alcohol-Impaired Drivers
This factsheet summarizes alcohol-related fatalities, including those in which drivers were aged 16 to 20 years old. (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation;no date, 2008 data)

Community How To Guides On Underage Drinking Prevention
The National Association of Governors’ Highway Safety Representatives, with financial assistance from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), developed a series of Community How To Guides that address fundamental components of planning and implementing a comprehensive underage drinking prevention program. (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration,U.S. Department of Transportation;2001)

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U.S. Department of the Treasury

U.S. Department of the Treasury

The U.S. Department of the Treasury is represented in the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Prevention of Underage Drinking by the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB). Key components of the TTB mission are to ensure that alcohol, tobacco, and firearms are labeled, advertised, and marketed in accordance with the law as well as to administer laws and regulations to protect the consumer and promote voluntary compliance.

U.S. Department of the Treasury Resources

Preventing Underage Alcohol Use: National Meeting of the States
This PowerPoint presentation given by William H. Foster, assistant administrator for the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, summarizes the history of alcohol use and legal drinking ages in the United States. It also describes the role of TTB in preventing underage drinking, particularly in regard to labeling and advertising of alcoholic beverages that may increase their appeal to youth. (Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, 2005)

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