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Underage Drinking Summary of the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health

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Underage Drinking Summary of the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health

The title of the infographic is 'Underage Drinking—Summary of 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health.' The infographic indicates that progress is being made in reducing underage drinking.

Below the title, the following text is shown: 'Every year, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration conducts a national survey of our nation's behavioral health. One measure is alcohol use by 12- to 20-year-olds. Data from the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health indicate that progress is being made in reducing underage drinking, with continuing declines in current, binge, and heavy drinking since 2002. In 2013, there were one-half million fewer 12- to 20-year-old current drinkers than in 2012. More needs to be done, however, as too many young people continue to risk their health and future through illegal and dangerous underage alcohol use.'

The next paragraph reads:  'Current = past-month alcohol use'; 'Binge = 5+ drinks/occasion'; 'Heavy = 5+ drinks/occasion at least 5 times/month.'

The next area of the infographic contains the heading 'How Many Young People Used Alcohol?' Above an image of a calendar for 2012 and 2013 is the text 'Fewer 12- to 20-year-olds reported current drinking.' To the right of the 2012 calendar is the text '9.3 million.' An arrow is pointing down to the next line of text, which is to the right of the 2013 calendar and reads, '8.7 million.'

The next heading is 'At What Age Did Young People Start Using Alcohol?' An image of people arranged in five rows of 20, representing the population of young people, is shown below the text 'Alcohol use often began at a young age.' The people in the graphic are shaded in blue to indicate that 83.5% of young people were younger than age 21 when they first started using alcohol. Below this graphic is the text 'The average age of first use among those under 21 was 16.2.'

A second image of people representing the population young people is below the text 'Of those who first used alcohol in 2013.' The graphic indicates that 59.1% of young people first used alcohol before the age of 18.

An image of four birthday cakes is below the text 'Rates of current underage drinking increased with age.' A numbered candle is on each cake to represent the different age groups. The graphic indicates that the rate of underage drinking was 2.1% for 12- to 13-year-olds, 9.5% for 14- to 15-year-olds, 22.7% for 16- to 17-year-olds, and 43.8% for 18- to 20-year olds.

The next heading is 'How Many Young People Reported Binge Drinking?' Images of people representing different age groups are below the text 'Nearly 6 million 12- to 20-year-olds were binge drinkers. Percentage of binge drinkers by age group increased with age.' The graphic indicates that the percentage of binge drinkers was 0.8% for 12- to 13-year-olds, 13.1% for 16- to 17-year-olds, 4.5% for 14- to 15-year-olds, and 29.1% for 18- to 20-year-olds.

The next heading is 'What Were the Drinking Rates Among College Students?' Three images of buildings with columns are below the text 'Most full-time college students (18- to 22-year-olds) used alcohol, often excessively.' The graphic indicates that, of college students, 59.4% were current drinkers, 39.0% were binge drinkers, and 12.7% were heavy drinkers.

The next heading is 'Where Did Young People Drink?'; which is followed by the text 'Underage drinking often occurred at home and with friends.' An image of two houses with people inside them is above the text '52.2% of current drinkers reported their last use of alcohol was in someone else's home, and 34.2% reported drinking in their own home.'

An image of a woman with a thought bubble showing a dinner being served on a platter is above the text 'Underage females were more likely than males to have had their last drink in a restaurant, bar, or club (8.8% vs. 4.5%).'

The next heading is 'Did Young People Drink With Friends?' An image of a house with people inside is to the left of the text 'Most 12- to 20-year-olds reported drinking with two or more friends when they did drink. The age group most likely to drink alone was 12- to 14-year-olds.' The graphic indicates that 81.1% of 12- to 20-year-olds reported drinking with friends when they did drink.

The next heading is 'How Did Young People Get Alcohol?' The graphic contains multiple images of people to represent the different ways young people reported obtaining alcohol. The first statistic in this section is 'Nearly one third (28.3%) paid for their last drink themselves.' The graphic indicates that 7.8% purchased their own alcohol, and 20.5% gave money to someone else to purchase alcohol. Next, the following text is shown: 'Of those who obtained the alcohol for free, the source was usually peers and family.' Below this text is three more images of people above the following statistics: '36.6% obtained alcohol from an unrelated person age 21 or older'; '16.4% got it from another person under 21'; and '24.5% received alcohol from a parent, guardian, or other adult family member.'

The next heading is 'What Were the Gender Differences in Underage Drinking?' An image of a male and female college student is below the text 'Binge drinking differed by gender.' Below this image is the text 'Male full-time college students ages 18 to 22 were more likely than their female counterparts to be binge drinkers (44.8% vs. 33.9%).'

The next heading is 'What Were the Rates of Alcohol Dependence and Drug Use Among Underage Drinkers?' Below this is the text 'Underage drinkers were more likely to develop alcohol or drug problems.'

An image of vertical bars representing 14.8% and 2.3% is to the right of the text 'Adults ages 21 or older who had first used alcohol at age 14 or younger (14.8%) were more than 6 times more likely to be classified with alcohol dependence or abuse than adults who had their first drink at age 21 or older (2.3%).'

An image of vertical bars representing 19.9% and 5.7% is located above the text 'Underage current drinkers were more likely than current drinkers of legal age to use illicit drugs within 2 hours of alcohol use on their last reported drinking occasion (19.9% vs. 5.7%).'

An image of a vertical bar representing 19.5% is located above the text 'Marijuana was the most commonly used drug (19.5% or 1.6 million underage drinkers) following alcohol use.'

Following the graphs is the text 'Underage drinking affects the health and safety of individuals, families, and communities. Help prevent underage drinking. Visit www.StopAlcoholAbuse.gov."

The URL for the data source is http://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUHresultsPDFWHTML2013/Web/NSDUHresults2013.pdf.

At the bottom of the infographic are the logos for SAMHSA and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Text at the bottom of the page reads "SAMHSA's mission is to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America's communities."


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