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Educators

 

Educators have a unique opportunity to open a dialog about underage alcohol use with their students. Use the following Classroom Resources to help young people learn about alcohol use and how it can affect their academic performance. Use the Materials for handouts to students and their parents or in classroom displays. Alcohol and Education offers research of special interest to educators.

Visit the Statistics page for facts about underage drinking and its consequences. The UAD Web Sites page provides links to several sites with additional resources for educators on helping students avoid underage alcohol use.

Classroom Resources

Protecting You/Protecting Me (Grades 1–5)
This classroom-based alcohol use prevention and vehicle safety program is designed for elementary school students aged 6–11 and high school students in grades 11 and 12. The program aims to reduce alcohol-related injuries and death among children and youth due to underage alcohol use and alcohol-related vehicle crashes. Topic areas discussed in this program include media awareness and literacy, alcohol use risk and protective factors, knowledge of the brain growth and development, vehicle safety knowledge and skills, and alcohol use. (National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services)
Reach Out Now/Reach Out Now Teach-In (Grades 5–6)
Reach Out Now is an initiative, developed through a collaboration between the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and Scholastic Inc., to provide fifth- and sixth-grade teachers with ready-to-use evidence-based underage drinking prevention materials. Resources include lesson plans and worksheets, an interactive wall poster, bonus skill-building activity worksheets, and a take-home discussion guide to stimulate discussions between students and their adult caregivers about underage drinking. (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services)
<em>Reach Out Now/Reach Out Now</em> Teach-In (Grades 5–6)
The Cool Spot Web Site (Grades 6–8)
The Cool Spot's content is drawn from research-based alcohol prevention curriculum for students in grades 6–8. The site includes the key elements of effective prevention programs: correction of norms perception, facts about alcohol misuse, challenges to expectations, and information about peer pressure and resistance skills. The Cool Spot adapts this content in an engaging, interactive format featuring vivid graphics and characters drawn in the “anime” style of Japanese comics. It focus tested very well in its intended audience of 11- to 13-year-olds, who particularly appreciated the peer pressure and resistance skills sections. The site includes an interactive, 10-question assessment that educators can use to determine whether students have gleaned some of the site's key learning objectives. (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services)
The Cool Spot Web Site (Grades 6–8)
Brain Power! Challenge: Grades 6–9
This module focuses on how two drugs, nicotine and alcohol, change the functioning of the brain and body. The goal of this module is to help students understand that although nicotine and alcohol are legal for adults, they are not harmless substances. Instead, both nicotine and alcohol can have a strong negative impact on the functioning of the body and brain, ranging from mild symptoms to addiction. (National Institute on Drug Abuse, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; June 2010)
Understanding Alcohol: Investigations into Biology and Behavior (Grade 7)
Produced by the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study and funded by National Institutes of Health’s Office of Science Education and National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, this free curriculum consists of six sequential, inquiry-based lessons for integration into a seventh-grade science class. All activities fulfill the requirements of the 5 E’s Model (Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, and Evaluate) and meet National Science Education Standards’ Content and Performance Standards. (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services)
AlcoholEdu for High School
This program is an online, interactive alcohol education and prevention course designed to increase alcohol-related knowledge, discourage acceptance of underage drinking, and prevent the increase of alcohol use and its related negative consequences. Topic areas include current alcohol use and intention to change drinking status, acceptance of underage drinking, knowledge about alcohol, passenger safety when a driver has been drinking, and perception of the ability to limit drinking.(National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services)

Materials

PDF IconUnderage Drinking: Myths vs. Facts
This brochure dispels common myths about underage alcohol use and helps 9- to 15-year-olds understand the dangers associated with using alcohol. (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; updated 2010)
<em>Underage Drinking: Myths vs. Facts</em>
Reach Out Now Poster
This poster, which includes a teacher’s guide on the reverse side, can be used to initiate classroom discussions on how students can refuse peer pressure or react to situations that encourage alcohol use.
<em>Reach Out Now Poster</em>
Underage Drinking Prevention Poster
The selections in this colorful poster’s vending machine represent the many activities youth can choose to do instead of drinking. Aimed to support underage drinking programs in middle schools, the poster directs students to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism’s adolescent underage drinking prevention Web site. (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; February 2006)
Underage Drinking Prevention Poster

Alcohol and Education

Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention for Youth: A Practitioner’s Guide
This guide is designed to help health care professionals quickly identify youth at risk for alcohol-related problems. Based on just two questions, one that asks about friends’ drinking and another that asks about personal drinking frequency, health care professionals can now detect risk early, in contrast to other screens that focus on established alcohol problems. This early detection tool aims to help prevent alcohol-related problems in children and youth before they start or address them at early stage. (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 2011)
Adolescent and School Health: School Connectedness
School connectedness—the belief held by students that adults and peers in the school care about their learning as well as about them as individuals—is an important protective factor. Research has shown that young people who feel connected to their school are less likely to engage in many risk behaviors, including alcohol, tobacco, and drug use, violence, and early sex. This fact sheet describes six strategies that teachers, administrators, other school staff, and parents can implement to increase the extent to which students feel connected to school. Links to additional resources also are provided. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; updated March 2011)
PDF IconThe Surgeon General’s Call to Action To Prevent and Reduce Underage Drinking: What It Means to You―A Guide to Action for Educators
This guide highlights key issues related to underage drinking found in the complete Call to Action To Prevent and Reduce Underage Drinking. It was developed to guide educators and other school personnel as to what action they can take against underage drinking and why. (Office of the Surgeon General, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2007)
Alcohol Alert No. 68: Young Adult Drinking
This Alcohol Alert describes why young people often choose to drink and how alcohol affects their brains. (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; April 2006)
Alcohol Alert No. 67: Underage Drinking—Why Do Adolescents Drink, What Are the Risks, and How Can Underage Drinking Be Prevented?
Alcohol is the drug of choice among youth. As a result, underage drinking is a leading public health problem in this country. This factsheet explores why adolescents drink and what can be done to prevent underage drinking and its consequences. (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; January 2006)

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